Keswick Mountain Festival

New Accessibility Zone set to open up Keswick Mountain Festival for more outdoor visitors

Bendrigg Trust are delighted to be a part of the brand new accessibility zone at the 2021 Keswick Mountain Festival!

The zone is being designed to make the festival more accessible and welcoming to visitors with disabilities and adaptive sporting needs. Supported by United Utilities and developed in partnership with not-for-profit company Experience Community, the zone will include special features, exhibitors and activities.

Founded in 2007, Keswick Mountain Festival (KMF) is presented by title partner Land Rover and is now one of the UK’s best-loved outdoor festivals, attracting thousands of visitors to Cumbria. From 10-12 September, KMF will provide its unique mix of live entertainment, sporting events, outdoor adventures, high profile speakers, taster activities, exhibitor stands and camping for all of the family. The event’s main base is in the KMF Festival Village on Crow Park, with the backdrop of Derwent water and the Lakeland fells.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Keswick Mountain Festival Accessibility Zone will be located just inside the Festival Village, on the flattest part of that area, with a ‘Mobiloo’ alongside it and parking for drivers with blue badges nearby. Disabled visitors and those with adaptive sporting needs will be able to watch the live entertainment on the main stage from a special viewing area (located close to the Mobiloo), and there will also be accessible toilets at the pop-up KMF campsite.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Thanks to support from United Utilities, KMF has been able to invite charities and not-for-profit groups to exhibit in the Accessibility Zone alongside commercial companies. Joining zone partner Experience Community, organisations that have signed up so far include :

Caving With Bendrigg Trust

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Craig Grimes, owner and Director of Experience Community, will also premiere a new film during the festival, as part of the Craghoppers 2021 Tent Talks programme. Growing up, Craig loved camping, walking, climbing, kayaking, caving and the outdoor life, then an accident left him paralysed from the chest down. Today, he runs Experience Community, which helps people with disabilities to access countryside adventures.

The KMF Accessibility Zone will also be the base for some dedicated activities hosted by Experience Community, including a guided walk on Saturday 11 September and an adapted bike ride on Sunday 12 September. The road sportives and DexShell Hell in the Fells gravel ride are all open to electric and adapted bikes, and organisers of the other sporting events will do what they can to make them as accessible as possible for all those who want to participate. In addition, there will be a test route for trying out vehicles that are being exhibited on the site.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Leading Para cyclist and Ordnance Survey ambassador Mel Nicholls has visited Keswick Mountain Festival several times and has taken part in the event’s Back o’ Skiddaw sportive. Mel comments: “Keswick Mountain Festival is a fabulous weekend of outdoor fun for everyone, with expert support for all to enjoy their chosen outdoor adventures, and some you’d never thought to try.  It’s a fantastic event that I recommend for everyone who loves the outdoors and I hope that as many people as possible come along and explore all there is to get out there!”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Nicola Meadley, KMF director, adds: “We want Keswick Mountain Festival to be a welcoming and vibrant hub for all outdoor enthusiasts and especially those with disabilities and adaptive sporting needs. Experience Community, Adapt-e and ICE Trikes all attended in 2019 and the idea for the KMF Accessibility Zone was born then. With support from United Utilities, we have been able to develop it into what will be one of the most exciting new elements at the festival, but this is just the start. We won’t achieve everything in year one and we will definitely learn a lot in September, but I’m equally certain that we will deliver a really positive experience for visitors who spend time in the zone.”

Tickets for the 2021 Keswick Mountain Festival are available at www.keswickmountainfestival.co.uk.

To find out more about this year’s festival, visit the website or Facebook, email info@keswickmountainfestival.co.uk, or follow @keswickfestival on Twitter and Instagram.

A couple of the Bendrigg Trust team will be present throughout the whole weekend so please do come along and say hello!

 

To find out more about Bendrigg Trust and the services we offer click on the following links for Families, Adults and Groups of all abilities.

 

 

What Bendrigg Means To Us…

What Bendrigg Means To Us…

A guest blog from Dawn Flint, mum to the lovely Lewis, 14.

 

What does Bendrigg mean to Lewis and I? Everything!

Throughout Lewis’ life ‘He’s happy watching the other children’ is a phrase I’ve heard time and time again. Those words are guaranteed to make my blood boil! Lewis is not happy watching others, he wants to be involved in everything.

We often describe Lewis as a white knuckle child.

He loves adventure, activity and speed. Bendrigg is one of very few places where he can experience all of those and participate in absolutely everything on offer!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Lewis is 14 and has an un-diagnosed genetic condition.

He has no independent mobility or speech and is reliant on us for all his care needs. Lewis uses an eye gaze communication aid to communicate and is constantly talking about Bendrigg, telling us that he loves the climbing wall, tube slide and indoor swing.

Lewis has been to Bendrigg 9 or 10 times over the last 5 years either with myself on family weekends or with school.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I can honestly say that our weekends at Bendrigg are the highlights of our year!

Watching Lewis climb walls and abseil back down, laugh with delight as he goes down a tube slide, relax in the amazing sensory room, grin as he spins round the room on a swing suspended from the ceiling to his favorite music and all alongside friends. It’s a truly heart-warming and magical place.

The staff at Bendrigg are amazing, taking as much time as is needed to make sure every child can participate. It’s all done with smiles on their faces and encouraging words. It truly is our favorite place to be, offering adventure, fun and friendship for all.


Check out some more heart warming testimonials and Bendrigg stories from families, groups, individuals and volunteers here.

What does Bendrigg mean to you? Get in touch with Martha our Marketing and Fundraising Officer to share your story.

 

 

The Power Of Corporate Partnership

Q8 Takeover Day

Guest Blog by Q8 Corporate Volunteers

Hey everyone, Q8 Corporate academy & Impact International are in the Lake District today helping out our friends at Bendrigg Trust, a charity that offers services for disabled people – their mission is to promote inclusion, encourage independence and build self-confidence through the safe provision of adventurous activities.

We’ve learnt some amazing skills on this epic sunny day and have enjoyed meeting all the special guests, amazing staff and exploring the stunning 15 acre grounds!

We have loads to show and share with you today. Not only have we heard all about their work but we’re not leaving without a bang and have been working hard, to help contribute something to this fantastic charity.

Check out the short video we created below :

 

 

 

 

We’d like to leave you with this quote by Winston Churchill

“We make a living by what we get, But we make a life by what we give”

After a fantastic day, this is our biggest takeaway. It is great to give back!

 

 

You too can make a huge impact at Bendrigg Trust find out how you can help here.

 

 

Make plans today, and you’ll be solid tomorrow

What People with Disabilities Need to Know About Planning for Their Financial Future – by Ed Carter

Practical self-care is something that many people with all kinds of disabilities can strive toward if they are smart about their finances. Not only can having a disability reduce your earning potential as you age, it can also increase the amount of money you’ll need to spend on medical, nursing, and custodial care. Here are some things you need to know about planning for your financial future.

Income vs. expenses

First things first: Get a handle on your budgeting (present and future). It may sound reductive to boil it all down to money in and money out, but that’s a good place to start. Knowing how much your disability costs you can help you better plan for how to fill in the financial gaps. On average, people with disabilities spend £583 more per month than their non-disabled peers.

Income includes money made through employment, government benefits, disability benefits, pensions, investment payouts, etc. Expenses are tougher to calculate because they can change rapidly — especially in terms of medical needs. It is your task to anticipate — as much as you can — your future care needs. Will you eventually need in-home nursing care? Perhaps a wheelchair? Maybe surgeries? It could be something as simple as hearing aids. Find out what your insurance will cover and then figure out ways to supplement your income.

Know your supplemental income options

Your first step is to look at your Personal Independence Payments, which range from £23.20 to £148.85 per week. Other options include adding riders to your life insurance policy, purchasing supplemental long-term care insurance, and opening a savings account to offset medical expenses. You will also want to start saving with the sole purpose of using said funds for later life care. These should be a savings funds separate from your other savings accounts, like your emergency fund for instance.

Downsizing is an option

Downsizing is an option that many with disabilities consider when they begin to approach their golden years. By moving into a smaller home and paring down your many possessions, you can not only save on your monthly mortgage, utilities, and all other home-related expenses, you will also make your daily life less stressful and put less strain on your body.

Choosing to downsize can be an emotional experience, even if it helps you stay independent as you age. If you experience sadness and trepidation, know that it’s completely normal and you can cope with it.

You need to have “The Conversation”

What conversation? The Conversation — the one you may be putting off because it’s uncomfortable or you feel you’re burdening your family. It’s the one where you make known, in no uncertain terms, your choices about your own care. There may come a time when your health care and finances need attending to and you are unable to do it on your own, so your family must be 100 percent certain of your desires.

One final word about planning for your financial future: Do what you can now to minimize your financial burden later. Many things about your disability are out of your control, but eating right, staying fit, and keeping your stress levels and mental health in check are not. Remember that your financial future is only as insecure as you allow it to be now. Make plans today, and you’ll be solid tomorrow.

 

Guest Blog written for The Bendrigg Trust by Ed Carter of AbleFutures.org

Ed is a retired financial planner and has created the Able Futures website to provide helpful financial information to members of the disabled community.

Photo by rawpixel on Unsplash