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Climbing Festival At Bendrigg Trust

Bendrigg Trust To Host Inclusive Climbing Festival!

On Friday 24th – Sunday 26th January 2020 Bendrigg Trust are hosting an amazing climbing festival with a jam packed programme of workshops and training sessions at their specialist outdoor centre in Kendal, Cumbria.

The festival is suitable for anyone aged 13+ with a learning disability or autism who….

Have never climbed before but want to give it a go

Have done a little bit of climbing but want to progress further

Have done lot’s of climbing and want to improve their skills

No matter your ability, we’ll help you to take your climbing to the next level! 

As well as climbing workshops and training, there will also be social activities for a chance to relax and make new friends!

For the full weekend, an inclusive festival package is available for £110 per person! Which includes a full weekend programme of Climbing Workshops & Training Sessions tailored to your ability, Comfortable Accommodation & Delicious Food! It is preferred that climbers attend the event with a “buddy” or carer.

To book your place please contact the Bendrigg Office by calling 01539723766 or fill in our online form HERE

 

Bendrigg Trust Climbing Festival 2020

Bendrigg Trust Climbing Festival

 

Please feel free to print out the poster above and put it up at your local school/youth club/climbing wall and help us to spread the word!

Did you know we also run an inclusive climbing club after school during term time? Find out more and Book your place HERE

 

 

Charity Challenges 2020!

It’s never been easier to support your favourite cause, which, if your reading this blog post, must be us! HURRAY!

With a whole host of amazing charity challenge events out there, take a look below to see what you, your friends, family and work collegues could get involved with to fundraise for Bendrigg in 2020!

2020 Charity Challenges

Edinburgh & Glasgow Kilt Walks

Dates : Glasgow – Sunday 26th April 2020 Edinburgh – Sunday 13th September 2020

Details : The Kiltwalk is a unique walking event offering three distances to choose from, suitable for walkers of all ages and experiences. The difference with this event is that 140% of the sponsorship money raised by Kiltwalkers comes directly to Bendrigg!

Find Out More 


Keswick To Barrow & Coniston To Barrow

Dates : Both – Saturday 2nd May 2020

Details : The walks are 40 miles and 21 miles respectively. Teams of between 4 and 12 members test themselves on a challenging route, to raise money for charities and good causes.

Find Out More


Super Hero Tri & Winter Wonderwheels

Dates : Super Hero Tri – Saturday 15th August 2020 Winter Wonder wheels – Saturday 6th December 2020

Details : The Superhero Series is the UK’s one and only disability sports series for the Everyday Superhero! In the Superhero Tri you can take part in a sprint, half or full Triathlon event. In the Winter Wonderwheels, Everyday Superheroes are invited to cycle, walk, run, push, or anything in between, a 1km, 5km or 10km course.

Find Out More


Great North Run

Dates : Saturday 13th September 2020

Details : Bendrigg has 15 charity places for the 40th Great North Run very special anniversary! The run is a half marathon starting in Newcastle and traversing 13.1 miles across the Tyne Bridge, through Gateshead and finishing along the coast road in South Shields.

Find Out More 


Prudential Ride London

Dates : Prudential RideLondon-Surrey 100 starts at 06:00 in Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park, then follows a 100-mile route on closed roads through the capital and into Surrey’s stunning countryside. Bendrigg only has a limited amount of places available so click below to find out more.

Find Out More


How will my fundraising make a difference to Bendrigg?

The money you raise will make a huge difference to our charity. Times are tough for everyone right now, but particularly for those families with a disabled member. We rely on donations to be able to subsidise our courses and ensure that people of all abilities can afford to come to Bendrigg and experience adventure. You can read more about our Impact on our 40 year Impact Report HERE or Contact Us on 01539 723766 if you’d like us to post you a copy.

 

How can I sign up to a charity challenge for Bendrigg in 2020?

Signing up couldn’t be easier! All you have to do is complete our Registration Form HERE and return it to sarah@bendrigg.org.uk

 

I’d like more information, how can I get in touch?

Sarah & Martha our fundraising dream team will be happy to answer any questions you have or help you with top tips to maximise your donations! Call them on 01539 723766 or use our online form HERE

 

Fancy planning your own fundraising event? Or supporting Bendrigg Trust in some other way? Check out our “Support Us” page for more details.

 

 

Gain An Hour, Give An Hour…

Last month, our fundraising Activity Festival unfortunately had to be cancelled due to a sickness outbreak. It was the right decision for the health and safety of our visitors, staff and volunteers however it means that the fund raised income we were counting on receiving during the festival has been lost.

This month the clocks go back and everyone will gain an hour of time. We are asking people to support Bendrigg by Giving the hour you Gain and donating your hourly wage.

By donating your extra hour, Bendrigg will be able to subsidise the cost of our courses for those that struggle financially – enabling everyone the opportunity of the ‘Bendrigg Experience’ no matter their social or financial circumstances.

We hoped to raise a minimum of £3,000 from our Activity Festival which would support 150 people to have a weekend of inclusive activities at Bendrigg. Please donate and ensure no one misses out.

Donate on our website – Click Here

Donate via Facebook Fundraiser – Click Here

 

 

Kidz To Adultz North 2019

Attending shows and exhibitions are a great opportunity to interact with new people and spread the word about the services we offer for people with additional needs. It also gives people the chance to speak to our staff face to face and get a good sense of who we are as a charity.

On Thursday 14th November we are attending the Kidz to Adults Exhibition in Manchester. This event is a great opportunity for families, individuals and people who work within the sector, to find out what support and resources are available to them. With a great range of trade and charity stalls showcasing everything from accessible kit and sensory equipment to information about accessible holidays and sports clubs, it’s sure to be a brilliant day! The event is free for anyone to attend and you can download your tickets easily online here.

On the day, we really want our stand to make a good first impression and have been busy preparing new information leaflets and posters to advertise our amazing courses for people with additional needs. After researching how to display our information professionally, we came across a website called Go.Displays who have been supporting charities and non-for profit organisations for many years by offering a free Switch Banner Stand or Table Top Display Board – this offer is available to registered charities, schools and non-profit organisations – and all you have to do is display a link to the offer on your own website in order to qualify (similar to this blog post!)

“At Go Displays we feel it’s important to give something back, this is why we developed the Charity Scheme enabling us to provide a free banner or display board. Across the years, we’ve helped hundreds of charities, non-profitable organisations and schools by supplying a product to help them with a display or event they have coming up.”

Vicky Toomer – Go Displays

We are so grateful to Go Displays for this very kind offer and can’t wait to try out our new display board at our upcoming events.

Are you attending this event?? Be sure to come and say hello, we’ll be at charity stand V16.

 

Why not check our our Facebook Events page for more information about other exhibitions we’re attending?

 

Barclays Bank Volunteer Party!

 

A huge thank you to the fantastic team from Barclays Bank who travelled from all over the UK to come and volunteer at Bendrigg yesterday.

They kindly brought some shrubs and a tree to plant at the side of our new pathway, they also built benches and helped with various other projects around our 5 acres of grounds!

 

It was a brilliant day. Thoroughly enjoyed helping out and was amazed at the facilities you have and the work you do.
Inspiring.

Claire Penrice, Barclays

 

Jonny from Barclays put together a great video of there day here at Bendrigg – Watch it HERE.

Want to get involved?

Sign up with a group of friends or work colleagues to volunteer for the day you’ll become part of the Bendrigg family and experience what it feels like to make a huge difference! For more information visit our “Volunteer” page or contact Kate, our Volunteer Co-ordinator on 01539 723766 or fill in our online contact form HERE

 

 

Overcome Barriers To Access The Great Outdoors

Barriers to participation

The World Health Organization (WHO) describes barriers as being more than just physical obstacles.

“Factors in a person’s environment that, through their absence or presence, limit functioning and create disability. These include aspects such as:

  • a physical environment that is not accessible,
  • lack of relevant assistive technology (assistive, adaptive, and rehabilitative devices),
  • negative attitudes of people towards disability,
  • services, systems and policies that are either nonexistent or that hinder the involvement of all people with a health condition in all areas of life.”

Often there are multiple barriers that can make it extremely difficult or even impossible for people with disabilities to function. Here are the seven most common barriers.

  • Attitudinal
  • Communication
  • Physical
  • Policy
  • Programmatic
  • Social
  • Transportation

(Taken from CDC Article – Read Full Article here)

At Bendrigg our mission is to give people the opportunity to smash through these barriers by doing things they may have never thought possible. We know that what we do helps to improve our participants confidence and self esteem. The hope is that upon completing their course at Bendrigg, each participant feels confident enough to overcome new barriers and face any challenges head on with a “I can do this” positive mental attitude.

The outdoor environment gives us a unique sense of freedom and we believe it’s extremely important that people of all abilities have access to the outdoors, not only as part of a residential, but on a regular basis back at home.

As well as an endless list of health benefits, time spent outdoors is proven to reduce stress and anxiety levels, eliminate mental fatigue,  improve memory, boost your immune system and work wonders for your mental health.

6 ideas and resources to help overcome barriers when accessing the great outdoors


1. The Wildlife Trust – Nature Reserves

There are many therapeutic benefits for people with disabilities to immerse themselves in nature. Nature reserves often offer a quieter environment which can help to restore balance in an over stimulated mind.

The Wildlife Trust have a number of accessible nature reserves across the country which offer close encounters with UK wildlife. From bird watching in a hide to exploring ancient woodland, nature reserves offer a quiet and exciting opportunity to connect with nature and wildlife.


2. Gardening & Horticultural Therapy

The therapeutic benefits of gardening on body and soul are well recognised nowadays. Countless reports have demonstrated the positive effects on physical, psychological and social health.

Thrive uses gardening to bring about positive changes in the lives of people living with disabilities or ill health, or are isolated, disadvantaged or vulnerable. They have 3 centres in the UK but also have access to volunteering projects around the UK that you could get involved in. Some of your local gardens may take on volunteers with the view to help people learn new skills, develop their confidence with gardening and meet new people. Helmsley Walled Garden are a great example of this!

Kingwood is a charity that provide support for people with Asperger Syndrome and Autism, they have put together a detailed report called Green Spaces, which explores outdoor environments for adults with Autism, you can read the full report online – click on the first search result to download the report here.


3. The Outdoor Guide – Access Tog

Julia Bradbury has developed a fantastic website “The Outdoor Guide” which has it’s very own Access TOG section with heaps of wheel-friendly walks across the UK. Each walk has been tried, tested and written up by Debbie North. The blog is full of helpful and practical advice including reviews of all terrain wheelchairs.

An outright purchase of an all terrain wheelchair can be expensive, but with a little research you’ll be pleasantly surprised at the amount of local places that hire them out free of charge. Many National Trust sites do this, including Tarn HowsMalham Tarn and Fountains Abbey – You must call ahead to pre-book.


4. Help With Transport Costs

Government and local councils offer discounts schemes and passes for disabled travellers and their carers. From rail cards to bus passes and dial-a-ride door-to-door minibus services – you can find out more information on this helpful page on The Mencap website.


5. Tackling Negative Attitudes

People with disabilities face many barriers every day–from physical obstacles in buildings to systemic barriers in employment and civic programs. Yet, often, the most difficult barriers to overcome are attitudes other people carry regarding people with disabilities.

A remedy for this is familiarity, getting people with and without disabilities to mingle as coworkers, associates and social acquaintances. In time, most of the attitudes will give way to comfort, respect and friendship. For example, volunteers to Bendrigg often come to us for the first time, not having much experience or knowledge of the difficulties that people with disabilities face. After having volunteered with us, they learn the importance of recognising a persons ability over there disability. They also share their experience with friends, families or work colleagues and become advocates, promoting equality and challenging peoples perceptions of disability.


6. Research local facilities and resources

After a quick google search or a look on Euan’s Guide, you may be surprised at what accessible facilities are available in your area. Whether it’s accessible walks, a quiet hour at your local swimming pool or accessible events, it’s always worth researching to see what’s available close by.

At Bendrigg we offer regular services and clubs for people with disabilities in our local community.

These services include :

  • a regular inclusive climbing club and outdoor rock days during half term!
  • our aiming high community playing field, complete with accessible roundabout, swing, nest swing and a range of adaptive bikes and trikes for all the family to enjoy.
  • sensory room open sessions every Monday morning excluding bank holidays – Bendrigg opens it’s sensory room to members of the public for 2 x 1 hour sessions in our fantastic sensory room.
  • Last but not least, our inclusive activity festival is coming up on the 28th September 2019. Our accessible and inclusive activity festival gives everyone to opportunity to come and have a taste of adventure! From flying down the zip wire, to climbing and abseiling – it’s a fun filled day for all the family to enjoy.

If you’d like to know more about what we do here at Bendrigg please don’t hesitate to get in touch.


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“None of us know our limits until we are allowed to test them”

After commenting on a recent twitter post about his trip to Bendrigg in 1992 & 1993, we asked Mark to share his story!

 

“In the early 90’s I was a support worker, employed by an inner London borough, working in the community supporting a small group of brain injured people. The work was tough but fun, my colleagues and clients became lifelong friends. My boss Paul was a very dry-humoured Cumbrian, exiled to London, and one day he came up with the idea of a holiday at Bendrigg.”

I was utterly stunned by the setting

“Before long we were packing up the persistently unreliable minibus and making the journey up the motorway. I had never been to the Lake District before and I was utterly stunned by the setting, it was a far cry from the inner London estate we had come from. For one of our guys it was one of the first times he had ever been out of central London, it was a genuine culture shock. I remember his face as we surveyed the open spaces and huge sky.”

We did things that I did not think could be done

“Our care tasks remained the same whether we were in London or the Lakes. People needed support to wash, dress and eat etc but now we were adding activities such as canoeing, abseiling and caving to our days. We did things that I did not think could be done, people with very limited movement and even more limited opportunity, took on physical tasks that looked impossible. It was the Bendrigg staff that made the impossible possible, it was their knowledge, encouragement and belief that pushed us all, me and my colleagues included, to go beyond what we thought we could do. True bravery is wheeling yourself backwards off of an abseiling wall when you have never attempted anything like that before and you never thought you could do it; I saw that happen more than once.”

It was a week of working hard and playing hard

“I recall that the evenings were as much fun as the days. I was taught to fire-breathe, a trick I still wheel out from time to time, much to the amazement of my own children (and the horror of health and safety officers the world over); but my inability to learn how to juggle has persisted. The week flew by and, following a second visit by the nice man from the AA, we packed the van and hit the M6 South. We were all exhausted, but we had earn’t this tiredness, it was a week of working hard and playing hard. It was so hard that we booked for the following year and did it all again (as did the nice man from the AA).”

None of us know our limits until we are allowed to test them

“It is more than quarter of a century since I last visited Bendrigg Lodge, I see from photographs that the centre has expanded but has remained true to its aims of inclusion and pushing boundaries and expectations. None of us know our limits until we are allowed to test them, many of us are hesitant, needing the support of trusted people to enable us to go one step further. Bendrigg did that for my clients, my colleagues and me. In the intervening years I am sorry to say that three of my four clients and two of my five colleagues have now passed away, some of my happiest memories of them all are of being on the wind-swept hillsides or lakes near Bendrigg. I still work with people affected by brain injury.”

They taught me to see ability

“My visits to Bendrigg were amongst the hardest working weeks I have ever had but they remain the most memorable too. They taught me to see ability, they showed me what it means to work in a team and they formed a lifelong love of the outdoors. I am a city-boy but I relax by spending time in the hills. I am certain that Bendrigg has had an impact on thousands of people in a similar way and I look forward to seeing it continue to thrive and give life-changing opportunities to many.”

 

Do you have a Bendrigg Story you’d like to share? We’d love to hear from you! 

Make plans today, and you’ll be solid tomorrow

What People with Disabilities Need to Know About Planning for Their Financial Future – by Ed Carter

Practical self-care is something that many people with all kinds of disabilities can strive toward if they are smart about their finances. Not only can having a disability reduce your earning potential as you age, it can also increase the amount of money you’ll need to spend on medical, nursing, and custodial care. Here are some things you need to know about planning for your financial future.

Income vs. expenses

First things first: Get a handle on your budgeting (present and future). It may sound reductive to boil it all down to money in and money out, but that’s a good place to start. Knowing how much your disability costs you can help you better plan for how to fill in the financial gaps. On average, people with disabilities spend £583 more per month than their non-disabled peers.

Income includes money made through employment, government benefits, disability benefits, pensions, investment payouts, etc. Expenses are tougher to calculate because they can change rapidly — especially in terms of medical needs. It is your task to anticipate — as much as you can — your future care needs. Will you eventually need in-home nursing care? Perhaps a wheelchair? Maybe surgeries? It could be something as simple as hearing aids. Find out what your insurance will cover and then figure out ways to supplement your income.

Know your supplemental income options

Your first step is to look at your Personal Independence Payments, which range from £23.20 to £148.85 per week. Other options include adding riders to your life insurance policy, purchasing supplemental long-term care insurance, and opening a savings account to offset medical expenses. You will also want to start saving with the sole purpose of using said funds for later life care. These should be a savings funds separate from your other savings accounts, like your emergency fund for instance.

Downsizing is an option

Downsizing is an option that many with disabilities consider when they begin to approach their golden years. By moving into a smaller home and paring down your many possessions, you can not only save on your monthly mortgage, utilities, and all other home-related expenses, you will also make your daily life less stressful and put less strain on your body.

Choosing to downsize can be an emotional experience, even if it helps you stay independent as you age. If you experience sadness and trepidation, know that it’s completely normal and you can cope with it.

You need to have “The Conversation”

What conversation? The Conversation — the one you may be putting off because it’s uncomfortable or you feel you’re burdening your family. It’s the one where you make known, in no uncertain terms, your choices about your own care. There may come a time when your health care and finances need attending to and you are unable to do it on your own, so your family must be 100 percent certain of your desires.

One final word about planning for your financial future: Do what you can now to minimize your financial burden later. Many things about your disability are out of your control, but eating right, staying fit, and keeping your stress levels and mental health in check are not. Remember that your financial future is only as insecure as you allow it to be now. Make plans today, and you’ll be solid tomorrow.

 

Guest Blog written for The Bendrigg Trust by Ed Carter of AbleFutures.org

Ed is a retired financial planner and has created the Able Futures website to provide helpful financial information to members of the disabled community.

Photo by rawpixel on Unsplash

 

 

Royal Visit

We are very excited to announce that we will welcoming Her Royal Highness the Countess Of Wessex at Bendrigg Trust on Wednesday 6th February 2019.
Her Royal Highness will be launching an exciting new (and secret for now!) project and will be meeting some of our residential groups. Watch this space for more details coming soon…

18/02/19 Update : After our wonderful visit from the Countess of Wessex, we are delighted to announce that she launched our Adventure For All Project Funded by the ScottishPower Foundation! Read more about this very exciting project.