Be Burns Aware

Burn & Scald accidents can be horrific and very painful. They not only cause physical injuries but can often result in psychological trauma. This can be particularly true for young people who often struggle with body image and self confidence. 

Support For Burns Survivors

The Scottish Burned Children’s Club is an organisation that support burns survivors. They came on a residential to Bendrigg this year with the aim to :

  • Bring burns survivors together so they don’t feel alone in what they are going through.
  • Provide opportunities to make new friends and relax in an environment where they feel safe and comfortable.
  • Through trying new activities and facing fears they overcome things independently and with the support of others, building confidence and trust in relationships with the people around them.
  • Burns survivors can often have intensive periods of medical treatment, operations and other procedures. An annual camp is a great chance for everyone to let loose and have fun again!

Our latest video in the Adventure For All Series follows the Scottish Burned Children’s Club on their week residential at Bendrigg. It’s amazing to see all the participants growing in confidence as they face their fears and take on new challenges, and is such a positive step forward to helping them rebuild their self esteem. They also had such a lot of fun, experiencing all that a residential and the great outdoors has to offer!

I don’t think our burns are what make us unique, it’s just who we are. It’s a mark that’s part of who we are and where we came from – Craig, SBCC

 


Burns Awareness and Prevention

Did You Know…

Prevention and good first aid are key to reducing the number of burns and scalds occurring in the UK every single day.

  • 7071 Children were seriously burned or scalded in 2018
  • Young children and the elderly are most vulnerable
  • The majority of accidents occur as a result of an accident that could easily be prevented
  • Scalds from Hot Drinks are the most common burn injury to children
  • Electric Hobs, Hair Straighteners, Bowl Spills, Irons & Fireworks are some of the other common causes of serious burns and scalds.

Take Care This Festive Season…

Watching fireworks is great fun. But taking care is important especially as children are more likely to get hurt by fireworks than adults. Here are some simple things that can help to reduce the risk to your family.

Sparkler Safety

Children under five are too young to safely hold a sparkler and don’t really understand why they might be dangerous. Avoid giving them one to hold.

Babies or Children can wriggle in your arms and reach out unexpectedly. Avoid holding a baby or child when you have a sparkler in your hand.

Children over five will still need you to supervise them when they use sparklers. It’s safest if they wear gloves when they’re holding them. They might seem like “fireworks lite” but sparkles can reach a temperature of 2000 degrees Celsius! Have a bucket of water handy to put them in so that no-one can pick up a hot one off the ground. Teach them not to wave sparklers near anyone else or run with them.

Remember… Always hold sparklers at arms length & wear gloves when handling them, follow the age guidance above and always put sparklers in a bucket of water when they go out so that no-one an pick a hot one off the ground.

Firework Safety

Most firework injuries happen at family parties or private displays, so understanding the dangers of fireworks can prevent injuries and in some cases save lives.

  • Avoid wearing loose or potentially flammable clothing
  • Always wear gloves when handling sparklers and fireworks
  • Always have buckets of water ready to put out small fires or to cool sparklers
  • Make sure children are supervised around fireworks and bonfires
  • Never drink alcohol if you’re setting off fireworks
  • Keep animals indoors and close curtains – frightened animals running around can cause accidents
  • Only purchase fireworks that are sold by a registered seller
  • Follow instructions carefully and light fireworks at arm’s length
  • Ensure spectators stand back from bonfires and fireworks
  • Never go back to a firework that has been lit – even if it hasn’t gone off

First Aid Advice – The 3 C’s

  1. COOL the burn with a running cold tap water for 20 minutes and remove all clothing and jewellery (unless it is melted or firmly stuck to the wound)
  2. CALL for help 999
  3. COVER with clingfilm or a sterile non-fluffy dressing or cloth. Making sure the injured person is kept warm.

Don’t… burst blisters or apply creams or lotions. 

For more detailed information about the treatment and prevention of burns and scalds please visit the NHS website : www.nhs.uk/conditions/burns-and-scalds/

 


Other Sources of Information

Information for this blog post has been written with guidance from the following sources.

Changing Faces www.changingfaces.org.uk 

Scottish Burned Children’s Club www.theburnsclub.org.uk,

Children’s Burns Trust www.cbtrust.org.uk

CAPT (Child Accident Prevention Trust) www.capt.org.uk

NHS website : www.nhs.co.uk

 

Why not check out our other Adventure For All Videos? Click here

Or find out more about our residential courses

 

Making Memories Together As A Family

The latest video in our Adventure for All series follows the lovely Bancroft Family. We asked them to share “a life in the day of the Bancrofts” and captured their recent residential to Bendrigg with PHAB families.

“For anyone with 3 young boys, life can be tough, but when you have a child with additional needs, things can become much more of a challenge” – Lisa, Mum

Archie, aged 11, has a rare genetic condition called Cri Du Chat syndrome. Learning difficulties, poor muscle tone & a high-pitched cat like tone of voice are amongst a few of the symptoms caused by this condition.

Over time, Lisa (Mum) and Matt (Dad), have built up a great network of support through attending various clubs, activities and Cri Du Chat conferences which has helped them to feel less isolated and build confidence as a family.

 

 

Phab Clubs

Phab has been providing inclusive opportunities for disabled and non-disabled people of all ages since 1957.  There are around 150 Phab Clubs across England and Wales, some meeting weekly, where people can enjoy each other’s company and take part in a wide range of activities and social events such as crafts, discos, sport, music, games, theatre visits or trips out.

Phab also provides a programme of exciting Residential Holiday Projects for families, children, young people and young adults, many of which are held at Bendrigg Trust. Whilst being away from home, either for a weekend or a week, everyone can make the most of the outdoor activities on offer, build their self-esteem, confidence and independence, make friends and have a huge amount of fun!

To find out more about the amazing Phab Holiday Projects or to see where your nearest Phab Club is then please go to our website www.phab.org.uk or call Rebecca Hargreaves (National Projects Manager) on 01254 824784

 

Riding For The Disabled

Riding For The Disabled (RDA) is a nationwide project which aims to enrich lives through horses. Run entirely by volunteers, RDA provides therapy, fitness, skills development and opportunities for achievement through horse and carriage rides.

They welcome clients with physical and learning disabilities and autism, and there are no age restrictions. With centres located all across the UK you can use the search tool by clicking on their website below to find a group that’s local to you.

www.rda.org.uk/rda-groups

 

Tom Cat Trikes

In the video you may remember seeing Archie smiling from ear to ear, riding along on a fabulous Tom Cat Trike. Going out on the bikes is a great activity for all the family, but for the Bancroft’s and probably many other families, purchasing an adaptive trike is only possible with some financial support.

The Tom Cat Trikes have a great page on their website which tells you about funding organisations that may be able to help towards the cost of a Tom Cat Trike.

www.tomcatuk.org/support-with-funding

Bendrigg Trust Family Weekends

It was wonderful to see all of the families from PHAB enjoying taking park in our adventure activities TOGETHER. Did you know that we run open family weekends where families with a disabled member (Parent or/and child) can come to Bendrigg for a fully inclusive weekend of FUN!

Check out the dates & prices for our upcoming family weekends here : www.bendrigg.org.uk/what-we-do/family-courses/

 

 

 

Check out the other videos from our Adventure For All series here : 

www.bendrigg.org.uk/news-events/adventure-for-all/

 

 

 

“None of us know our limits until we are allowed to test them”

After commenting on a recent twitter post about his trip to Bendrigg in 1992 & 1993, we asked Mark to share his story!

 

“In the early 90’s I was a support worker, employed by an inner London borough, working in the community supporting a small group of brain injured people. The work was tough but fun, my colleagues and clients became lifelong friends. My boss Paul was a very dry-humoured Cumbrian, exiled to London, and one day he came up with the idea of a holiday at Bendrigg.”

I was utterly stunned by the setting

“Before long we were packing up the persistently unreliable minibus and making the journey up the motorway. I had never been to the Lake District before and I was utterly stunned by the setting, it was a far cry from the inner London estate we had come from. For one of our guys it was one of the first times he had ever been out of central London, it was a genuine culture shock. I remember his face as we surveyed the open spaces and huge sky.”

We did things that I did not think could be done

“Our care tasks remained the same whether we were in London or the Lakes. People needed support to wash, dress and eat etc but now we were adding activities such as canoeing, abseiling and caving to our days. We did things that I did not think could be done, people with very limited movement and even more limited opportunity, took on physical tasks that looked impossible. It was the Bendrigg staff that made the impossible possible, it was their knowledge, encouragement and belief that pushed us all, me and my colleagues included, to go beyond what we thought we could do. True bravery is wheeling yourself backwards off of an abseiling wall when you have never attempted anything like that before and you never thought you could do it; I saw that happen more than once.”

It was a week of working hard and playing hard

“I recall that the evenings were as much fun as the days. I was taught to fire-breathe, a trick I still wheel out from time to time, much to the amazement of my own children (and the horror of health and safety officers the world over); but my inability to learn how to juggle has persisted. The week flew by and, following a second visit by the nice man from the AA, we packed the van and hit the M6 South. We were all exhausted, but we had earn’t this tiredness, it was a week of working hard and playing hard. It was so hard that we booked for the following year and did it all again (as did the nice man from the AA).”

None of us know our limits until we are allowed to test them

“It is more than quarter of a century since I last visited Bendrigg Lodge, I see from photographs that the centre has expanded but has remained true to its aims of inclusion and pushing boundaries and expectations. None of us know our limits until we are allowed to test them, many of us are hesitant, needing the support of trusted people to enable us to go one step further. Bendrigg did that for my clients, my colleagues and me. In the intervening years I am sorry to say that three of my four clients and two of my five colleagues have now passed away, some of my happiest memories of them all are of being on the wind-swept hillsides or lakes near Bendrigg. I still work with people affected by brain injury.”

They taught me to see ability

“My visits to Bendrigg were amongst the hardest working weeks I have ever had but they remain the most memorable too. They taught me to see ability, they showed me what it means to work in a team and they formed a lifelong love of the outdoors. I am a city-boy but I relax by spending time in the hills. I am certain that Bendrigg has had an impact on thousands of people in a similar way and I look forward to seeing it continue to thrive and give life-changing opportunities to many.”

 

Do you have a Bendrigg Story you’d like to share? We’d love to hear from you! 

A tale of Bendy Pot

At Bendrigg we see the impact that a high-quality residential has on our clients every day. People discover what is truly within them – what depths of character, what powers of determination, what sense of joy. It is no exaggeration to say that for many visitors, a stay at Bendrigg can prove to be a life-changing experience for both participants and volunteers/carers/teachers alike! ‘When Joel got the Bends’ is a wonderful case study from Birmingham Phab Camps volunteer James about the importance of  perceptions and ultimately believing in yourself and others. Read the full story here.

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IMG_1355 Joel

How outdoor learning benefits people with disabilities

Ask any adult what their fondest memory of school is and most will come back with an exciting story about a residential trip; how they explored, played, took risks, tried new things and made new friends. At the time, you don’t realise how these experiences shape who you become later in life.

The Government are committed to making such opportunities available to everyone, no matter their background, ability or needs. In their recent white paper ‘Educational Excellence Everywhere’, the Department for Education outlined the need for every child to have experiences that equip them with “the knowledge, skills, values, character traits and experiences that will help them to navigate a rapidly changing world with confidence”.

High-quality residentials play an important part in this aim with impacts being seen immediately. The research project, Learning Away, demonstrated the impact that residential learning can have on learner engagement, achievement and relationships. They found that “a residential learning experience provides opportunities and benefits/impacts that cannot be achieved in any other educational context”. These traits not only open doors to employment and social opportunities but underpin academic success, happiness and wellbeing.

It can be argued that these benefits are even more profound and life-changing for the 0.9million children (7%) in the UK who are disabled. High-quality residentials provide “opportunities for students with disabilities to be engaged in physical activities” which is greatly needed as 86% of families with disabled children go without leisure activities. Add to this the fact that 65% of families caring for disabled children report feeling isolated frequently or all of the time and the need for truly inclusive outdoor provision is clear.

Inspiration through adventure

“George” (a pseudonym) was one such student for whom a brilliant residential had a profoundly positive benefit. Therry, a teacher who frequently brought students on residential courses to Bendrigg Trust, tells his story:

The youngest student we ever had with the team was an 8 year old young man, George, with cerebral palsy, epilepsy and profound visual and auditory impairments. This was to be his first time away from his family and home. He blossomed with his responses and became so smiley and noisy (to the degree of cheeky!) showing us there were ways around, through and over the barriers we previously had believed to be there in the school environment.

Once free of his wheelchair and secure in his climbing gear, George felt his way carefully up the climbing wall requiring minimal support from Bendrigg staff but making his own choices, as his fingers and feet found bumps, hollows and things to push and pull on. He was able to fly along the zip wire with happy howls of delight and his eyes, which we understood to provide him with no vision, sparkled. We know that Bendrigg worked its magic in ways no one could have imagined and we are so grateful that George was able to have this experience. I wish it was possible to bottle this ‘Bendrigg magic’ from start to finish so everyone could see, and truly believe what each individual can achieve.

“George” may be a made-up name but his story is real.

Bendrigg Trust believes in the impact that high-quality residential courses can have for young people with a disability; combining activities that they never dreamt possible with a welcoming and inclusive home-from-home. From learning to make your own bed to taking your first journey in a canoe, Bendrigg believes in giving young people skills for life, an increased motivation and appetite for learning and broadening horizons, often opening up a whole new world of opportunity.

 

Do you have a story about the impact outdoor learning? Comment below and let us know!